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Coping with Malaria amid COVID-19

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The country is fighting to help those affected by malaria, however, by distributing 4.6 million bed nets nationwide between May and June. Much of this had been done by mass digital communications across platforms. Journalists have ensured malaria coverage has increased sevenfold in the first half of 2020. Many stakeholders are also working on education at the community level. Much progress has been made in the fight against malaria and since 2000, 600,000 lives may have been saved across the world, reaching the global consciousness. It would be a huge shame to lose this progress now.Due to disruptions this year in delivering mosquito nets and medicines, the World Health Organisation (WHO) has predicted malaria deaths across sub-Saharan Africa could double. This could reach the point that disruptions due to COVID-19 may end up resulting in more deaths elsewhere (from malaria, TB and HIV) than from coronavirus itself.

Non-profits have been tirelessly working to save lives, including Speak up Africa and PATH on their Zero Malaria Starts With Me Campaign. This aims to increase awareness and prioritize malaria with the long-term aim of eliminating it altogether. It works in three pillars: engaging governments, the private sector and local communities.

Some countries have experience of deadly diseases already having suffered from the Ebola outbreak in 2014. In Sierra Leone, this is both a blessing and a curse. They have experience in slowing the spread of a deadly virus, but people were also naturally fearful when COVID-19 hit. This can harm children because their families fear going to health centres and hospitals due to catching COVID-19. If a child with a fever isn’t checked out, nobody will know if it’s something more serious.

The country is fighting to help those affected by malaria, however, by distributing 4.6 million bed nets nationwide between May and June. Much of this had been done by mass digital communications across platforms. Journalists have ensured malaria coverage has increased sevenfold in the first half of 2020. Many stakeholders are also working on education at the community level. Much progress has been made in the fight against malaria and since 2000, 600,000 lives may have been saved across the world, reaching the global consciousness. It would be a huge shame to lose this progress now.

Used Source:

https://africanarguments.org/2020/11/11/how-can-countries-continue-to-combat-malaria-during-a-pandemic/

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