A is a single mum who contacted the Nottingham City Council for seeking help was linked to us for help especially due to language and culturally sensitive support.

With four young children at home, it was not possible for the mum to easily go to the shops to get their essentials, particularly with conflicting stories about if she could take the children with her. She was also concerned about their health and the long ques that she was seeing in the shops.

The council put her in touch with Mojatu Foundation team for support, especially given her language and cultural requirements. The team texted and called the same day to check in with her, and make sure she was doing ok and to confirm the items she required. She was especially delighted by the speed with which the Mojatu support team and the Nottingham City Council staff responded and dealt with her case.

She said it was nice to have someone to talk to and to know that people cared. The team made her laugh and made the situation seem manageable. They agreed with her that they could bring a delivery of food a few days later. They also put her in contact with a local driver who could bring milk and bread as she could not get out.

After delivering her food, the team have stayed in touch to make sure she was ok. The experience made her feel supported, and reassured to know there was a community around her in Nottingham willing to help. 

The mother was full of praise to the team and she said that, “Mojatu team and Nottingham City Council really made me feel people in Nottingham care. I had never felt that before. Me and my children are now happier and safer that we know there are people we can call in Nottingham for support”.

 

Mojatu Foundation launches new accredited training programmes for Kutambua Project. The new training programmes, run with partners Fearless Youth Association and FarmEco Community Care Farm, will officially be launched this October.

Mojatu Foundation have been working with local BME and new and emerging communities for the last five years, and currently run training courses including media training, and driving theory, particularly focussing on supporting asylum seekers and refugees.

Kutambua, the name for the training programmes means They are also well recognises for their training with the NHS, schools and faith leaders around FGM awareness.

Valentine Nkoyo, CEO of Mojatu said, “We are so proud to be able to develop our training and support more people from our communities. We want to be able to keep providing opportunities for support, volunteering and training to ensure that BME community members understand their value and have the best possible opportunities.”

Mojatu has become a recognised centre to offer Open Awards qualifications in the following courses from now until end of 2020 in the following categories:
1. Health, Public Services & Care
2. Agriculture, Horticulture, and Animal Care
3. Arts, Media and Publishing
4. Preparation for Life & Work

Training opportunities are varied and offer opportunities for everyone, including learning how to become a radio presenter, CV writing and agro-forestry.

Mojatu Foundation, who were instrumental in getting Nottingham City to declare Zero Tolerance to Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) in 2016, are now looking at how best to accredit their FGM training.

Click for more information about Mojatu Foundation.  Or to find out about joining or referring someone to the training: info@mojatu.com

To find out more about their work, or book FGM training: edith@mojatu.com

Partners:
Fearless Youth Association, FYA: http://www.fyaonline.com/
Farmeco Community Care Farm: https://farmeco.co.uk/