10.9 C
London
Saturday, December 9, 2023

News:

Our Race for Life: Running 10K for Cancer Research

Community journalist Tristan Best takes us through his personal journey through running a 10K race for charity. Together, my friend Kaylan Grandon and I raised over...

The crew of the missing titanic sub faces hypothermia risk as oxygen supply dwindles

The crew members aboard the missing submarine, which embarked on a journey to explore the wreckage of the Titanic but lost all communication, are...

Sports

Business owner inspires Derby youth with juggling and table tennis

A Derby business is using juggling and table tennis...
spot_imgspot_img

Community

Event

International Girl Child Day, African Girl and Education

Girl Day is celebrated every year on October 11 as an opportunity to raise awareness about the unique challenges faced by girls around the world, especially in Africa, and the importance of providing them with quality education. In this article, we explore the Day's importance in the context of education in Africa, the challenges faced by girls, and initiatives aimed at improving their access to education. Education is a human right and the basis of personal and social development. However, African girls often face many barriers that prevent them from accessing education. These issues may be cultural, economic or political, but they all contribute to gender inequality in education. Girls' Day provides an opportunity to address these issues and work for gender equality in education.One of the most important problems faced by girls in Africa is early marriage and pregnancy. Cultural norms in many African societies dictate that girls should marry at a young age, often forcing them to drop out of school. Additionally, the lack of comprehensive sex education can lead to unintended pregnancies, further hindering their educational progress. Initiatives that raise awareness about the importance of delaying marriage and pregnancy until after completing their education are crucial.Another major obstacle is poverty. Many families in Africa struggle to meet basic needs, and education can be costly due to expenses like uniforms, books, and transportation. Girls are often the first to be withdrawn from school when a family faces financial constraints. To address this issue, scholarships, school donation programs, and affordable school supplies can help reduce the financial burden on families and support girls' education.Additionally, especially in rural areas, the distance to school will prevent girls from going to school. Unsafe travel and long distances can put them at risk. Building more schools and providing transportation closer to communities could help solve this problem. In many African countries, boys are expected to be encouraged in education and girls are expected to work within the family. It is important to change these attitudes and promote the value of girls' education. Social awareness programs and inclusive education programs that challenge stereotypes can play a key role.Child labor is another problem affecting girls. Many girls have to work to support their families, leaving little time for education. Government policies and international organizations can work to eliminate child labor and ensure girls have the opportunity to go to school.Unfortunately, conflicts and conflict in many parts of Africa have disrupted education and made it difficult for girls to access education. Efforts to build peace and improve education in post-conflict regions are critical to providing girls with a stable and safe learning environment.One of the best ways to improve educational opportunities for girls in Africa is to support and train female teachers. Many female teachers can act as role models and make it easier for girls to stay in school by creating an inclusive environment.Investing in girls' education in Africa has many long-term benefits. It can break the cycle of poverty, improve women's health, and promote gender equality. Girls who receive an education are more likely to make informed decisions about their health, family, and career. They are also more likely to become financially independent and contribute to their communities and economies. Several organizations, both local and international, are actively working to improve the education of girls in Africa. Plan International, UNICEF, and the Malala Fund are just a few examples. They provide resources, advocacy, and support to ensure that girls have equal access to quality education.In conclusion, Girl Child Day serves as a reminder of the challenges faced by girls in Africa when it comes to education. The challenges they face are many and include cultural barriers, financial constraints, and gender stereotypes. But through a combination of advocacy, policy change, and organizational efforts, progress can be made to ensure that girls receive a quality education just like boys. Investing in girls' education is not only a human rights issue but also a key driver of economic growth in Africa. This is something worth celebrating and encouraging on Girls' Day and every day.

More than skin deep

The Big Interview

One-on-One with Penny Cooper

She is a philanthropist, community champion, a goddess of charity and a human who loves humanity. She lives her life for others...
spot_img

Business

Economy

spot_img

Lifestyle

Black wordsmiths headline at inaugural Derby Poetry Fest

A trio of Black poets performed as the headlining...

‘Embrace your inner empress’: An overview of Derby’s business brunch

Empress Revolution CEO Rufaro Hwindingwi celebrates her seven-year reign...

Rising from the ashes: In conversation with Nigerian singer PHEENIX

We speak to Emmanuel “PHEENIX” Olih about how living...

Kenyans Protest the Rising Cost of Living in the Streets

Kenya has recently experienced a rise in public unhappiness...
spot_imgspot_imgspot_img

Education

spot_img

all articles

What black writers think about the UK’s publishing industry – a survey

As people seek to educate themselves in response to Black Lives Matter protests, sales of books by black British authors, such as Reni Eddo-Lodge...

Is Quinoa Low Carb (or Keto-Friendly)?

Many people looking to lose weight or manage chronic health conditions decide to restrict their carb intake. Although grains are normally off-limits on low carb...

Black History Month

Black History Month is celebrated in October in the United Kingdom unlike the U.S where the month of February has been set aside for this auspicious occasion. It...

Engine 2 Diet Review: Does It Work?

The Engine 2 Diet is a “plant strong” eating pattern that prioritizes nutrient-dense ingredients like fruits, veggies, whole grains, and legumes. Unlike other eating plans,...
- Advertisement - < img src="https://mojatu.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/01/rec-content-blue-5.png">

Coronavirus update: £100 fines for not wearing a face mask in England’s shops from July 24

Following the easing of the lockdown allowing the general public to go on to their normal businesses, pressure has been mounting on the government to...

Breastfeeding and Antibiotics: What You Need to Know

Let’s face it: Whether you like it or not, breastfeeding moms get sick sometimes. When that happens, it’s not fun at all… because there’s...

Celebrating Black Footballers

Horace Francis, Nottingham FA and Inspire to Succeed CIC, hosted a question and answer session with a panel of guests comprising former football professionals, coaches and administrators at...

Subscribe

- Gain full access to our premium content

- Never miss a story with active notifications

- Browse free from up to 5 devices at once

Health

International Girl Child Day, African Girl and Education

Girl Day is celebrated every year on October 11 as an opportunity to raise awareness about the unique challenges faced by girls around the world, especially in Africa, and the importance of providing them with quality education. In this article, we explore the Day's importance in the context of education in Africa, the challenges faced by girls, and initiatives aimed at improving their access to education. Education is a human right and the basis of personal and social development. However, African girls often face many barriers that prevent them from accessing education. These issues may be cultural, economic or political, but they all contribute to gender inequality in education. Girls' Day provides an opportunity to address these issues and work for gender equality in education.One of the most important problems faced by girls in Africa is early marriage and pregnancy. Cultural norms in many African societies dictate that girls should marry at a young age, often forcing them to drop out of school. Additionally, the lack of comprehensive sex education can lead to unintended pregnancies, further hindering their educational progress. Initiatives that raise awareness about the importance of delaying marriage and pregnancy until after completing their education are crucial.Another major obstacle is poverty. Many families in Africa struggle to meet basic needs, and education can be costly due to expenses like uniforms, books, and transportation. Girls are often the first to be withdrawn from school when a family faces financial constraints. To address this issue, scholarships, school donation programs, and affordable school supplies can help reduce the financial burden on families and support girls' education.Additionally, especially in rural areas, the distance to school will prevent girls from going to school. Unsafe travel and long distances can put them at risk. Building more schools and providing transportation closer to communities could help solve this problem. In many African countries, boys are expected to be encouraged in education and girls are expected to work within the family. It is important to change these attitudes and promote the value of girls' education. Social awareness programs and inclusive education programs that challenge stereotypes can play a key role.Child labor is another problem affecting girls. Many girls have to work to support their families, leaving little time for education. Government policies and international organizations can work to eliminate child labor and ensure girls have the opportunity to go to school.Unfortunately, conflicts and conflict in many parts of Africa have disrupted education and made it difficult for girls to access education. Efforts to build peace and improve education in post-conflict regions are critical to providing girls with a stable and safe learning environment.One of the best ways to improve educational opportunities for girls in Africa is to support and train female teachers. Many female teachers can act as role models and make it easier for girls to stay in school by creating an inclusive environment.Investing in girls' education in Africa has many long-term benefits. It can break the cycle of poverty, improve women's health, and promote gender equality. Girls who receive an education are more likely to make informed decisions about their health, family, and career. They are also more likely to become financially independent and contribute to their communities and economies. Several organizations, both local and international, are actively working to improve the education of girls in Africa. Plan International, UNICEF, and the Malala Fund are just a few examples. They provide resources, advocacy, and support to ensure that girls have equal access to quality education.In conclusion, Girl Child Day serves as a reminder of the challenges faced by girls in Africa when it comes to education. The challenges they face are many and include cultural barriers, financial constraints, and gender stereotypes. But through a combination of advocacy, policy change, and organizational efforts, progress can be made to ensure that girls receive a quality education just like boys. Investing in girls' education is not only a human rights issue but also a key driver of economic growth in Africa. This is something worth celebrating and encouraging on Girls' Day and every day.

Adolescent Mental Health: A Growing Problem

Adolescent mental health has become a serious problem in...

News Today Prioritising Mental Health – Issue 1

Tuesday November 14, 2023 Mojatu Foundation Chelsea Alabi 'Mental Health is a...